The Washington Times: D.C. Council Seeks to Flush Towelettes from City Sewers

Original source: The Washington Times By Ryan M. McDermott - The Washington Times - Monday, November 14, 2016 The D.C. Council wants to take a better look at what residents are flushing down their toilets. City lawmakers are weighing a ban on so-called “flushable” wipes — those thick, moistened towelettes that promise not to clog your pipes. The...

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American Council on Science and Health: Hopefully, Common Sense Wipes Away NYC Sanitary Wipe Bill

Original source: The American Council on Science and Health    By Erik Lief — October 17, 2016A quick perusal of the New York City Council calendar shows that a hearing of the Committee on Environmental Protection, originally slated for this Wednesday, won't be going off as scheduled. Ironically, this will serve the public interest, since at the...

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Fiber Journal: Dispersible Decisions

Original source: Fiber Journal  (Published October 16, 2016) Some 1,335,000 tons of nonwoven fabric will be consumed by the wipes manufacturers in 2016. North America’s nonwovens industry body INDA is heavily involved in ensuring the healthy growth of flushable wipes, despite a number of problems By Adrian Wilson, Correspondent The market for di...

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Nonwovens Industry: Industry Continues Efforts To Keep Wipes Out of the Toilet

Original source: Nonwovens Industry By Karen McIntyre, editor | June 23, 2016 At the World of Wipes Conference last week, industry insiders provided an update on efforts to combat threats posed to the wipes industry due to their supposed role in clogging sewage systems. INDA, the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics, has been involved in these ef...

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Crain's New York: Sewer politics: Council bill blames wrong product for clogging treatment plants

Original source: Crain's New York  By Dave Rousse Paper towels. Baby wipes. Even dental floss. These products are just a very small sample of the items clogging New York City’s sewer system. There’s a problem in New York City’s wastewater treatment plants, and—pardon the pun—it stinks. So, bravo to the city’s Department of Environmental Protecti...

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